England

Famous Emigrants

English-born actor and Oscar winner Leslie Townes “Bob” Hope (29 may 1903 – 27 July 2003) was the son of English stonemason William Henry Hope and Welsh light opera singer Avis née Townes. The family immigrated to Cleveland, Ohio in 1908. They entered the States through Ellis Island on 30 March 1908 after sailing aboard the SS Philadelphia.

Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (3 May 1903 – 14 October 1977) was a popular singer and actor. He was born in Tacoma, Washington as the fourth of seven children to Harry Lincoln Crosby and Catherine Helen née Harrigan, the daughter of a builder from County Mayo in Ireland. His paternal ancestors immigrated to North America already in the 17th century, among them Thomas Prence born in England and Patience Brewster whose family came over on the Mayflower.

World renown novelist and journalist Ernest Miller Hemmingway (21 July 1899 – 2 July 1961) was born in Oak Park, Illinois a suburb of Chicago. His father Clarence Edmonds Hemmingway was a doctor, his mother was former aspiring opera singer Grace née Hall a homemaker. The widowed maternal grandfather Ernst Miller Hall, an English immigrant and Civil War veteran lived with them in the family home.

Actor James Maitland Stewart (20 May 1908 – 2 July 1997) was born in Indiana, Pennsylvania as the son of hardware store owner Alexander Maitland Stewart and Elizabeth Ruth née Jackson. The Stewart ancestors were of Scottish origin and had served in the American Revolution, War of 1812 as well as the Civil War already.

Judy Garland was born as Frances Ethel Gumm on 10 June 1922 in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Long after her death on 22 June 1969 she is still famous for her acting and singing. Her parents Frank Gumm and Ethel Marion Milne were vaudevillians and both their ancestries can be traced back to the colonial days of the United States. The Gumm family descends from the Marable family of Virginia, the Milne family from Patrick Fitzpatrick who arrived in Smithtown from Ireland in the 1770s.

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